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Nap Transitions
When it comes to your baby sleeping well you are going to face many hurdles in keeping things on track. Milestones, teething, sleep regressions are only some of the factors involved in the first few years. As they develop their sleep needs to evolve and change and naps form a huge part of that.

In this article, we are going to look at how naps change and adjust over the first 3 years of your child’s life and importantly how to recognise when a change needs to be made in their napping routine to keep their sleep in check.

If you are experiencing some of the following factors in your child’s napping routine over the course of a few days then it may be time to look at making some adjustments;

There are age ranges that these transitions generally start to happen and it's important to watch out for them and be prepared for them so that you can stay on top of the healthy sleep that you have created;

4 – 6 Months

At this stage, you should be seeing a patter of 3 naps a day for your little one. I recommend that the morning nap is the shortest nap of the day (45 minutes) and the 2nd nap is a long nap.

Nap Transitions
This creates a balance that will take you long into the future of napping for your child. There is normally then the 3rd nap later in the afternoon that acts as a refresher before bedtime – this is a cat nap and should be approx 30-45 mins long & it is one that I support to be in the buggy out walking to get fresh air for all.

6 – 9 Months

Within this age range, your child will start to resist that 3rd nap or start to resist bedtime after having the 3rd nap. This is a sign that adjustment is needed. Start to shave back that 3rd nap until you find the sweet spot or drop it totally and bring bedtime forward for a time until your child adjusts to the change.

You may also find that you need to give longer wake periods between naps in this age range to keep things balanced. A child of 6 months may only be able to stay awake for 2 hours between naps however a child of 9 months, who is sleeping well at night, may be able to stretch to 3 hours. If you start to see some of the factors listed above in your little ones napping routine then adjust things until you find the right balance.

By the end of this phase, your baby should be sleeping 2 naps a day – a morning nap of 45 minutes and a 2nd longer nap of up to 2 or 2.5 hours.

14 – 16 Months

If you have maintained the recommended napping structure of one short nap in the morning and one long nap in the afternoon what you are probably going to see in this range is that your child starts to resist that 2nd nap or that it has to be pushed out and out for them to be tired enough to take it.

Nap Transitions
This is a sign that you may need to start transitioning to 1 nap a day. It might be easier to simply allow your child to take one long nap in the morning but this is not supportive of their sleep phases and may result in an overtired little one by bedtime and perhaps some early morning waking could sneak in.

As such I recommend that you shorten the morning nap by 10 minutes every 3 days until your little one is only having a quick 10-15 minute cat nap while simultaneously bringing the 2nd nap closer and closer to a 12-noon start. Once you have gotten to this then drop the first nap and try to move to one nap a day. This may mean that your 1 nap is a little earlier than 12 noon but allow your little one to sleep up for up to 2.5 hours to get the sleep they need. You may need to implement an early bedtime during this transition as it can take children a little while to get used to the change. I recommend that once you move to 1 nap a day you stick to it and resist having a flip flop between a 1 nap and a 2 nap schedule. It will take time for your child to adjust but it will come with consistency.

2.5 – 3 Years

At this stage in the game, you should have that one nap a day down. However, in this age range, you are going to see some nap resistance going on.

Nap Transitions
Your child will either no longer want to nap – the drive for sleep has dropped – or they will be resisting bedtime or waking early in the morning. These are all signs that their regular nap needs to be shortened or dropped.

This can be a hard stage for everyone however I combat this with early bedtimes. Don’t be afraid to put your tired child to bed a little earlier during this transition. It is not going to mean they wake up early – it will mean they will get the sleep they need but at night rather than during the day which then has a negative impact on their night's sleep.

Happy Sleeping Everyone!

Spring Clock Change
Like we don’t have enough to contend with on the baby and child sleep front without clock changes being thrown into the mix. You may have just gotten on top of the Autumn clock change and now we are facing into another one at 1 am on Sunday, March 31st.

I refer to this clock change as the Spring Forward Clock Change. Out of the two clock changes that happen each year, this is the one that is to be feared the least! In fact, if you have an early riser in the house this could be the clock change of your prayers as 5 am starts can become a 6 am start after the change!

For me there are three routes you can take when it comes preparing for this clock change;

Route 1 – Do nothing! If you are consistent and jump into the change then your child should adjust. If you have an already settled sleeper then this could be the option for you. Stick to their routine and things will fall back into place within a few days – just remain consistent and don’t allow any new settling habits to form.
Spring Clock Change

Route 2 – Split the difference. On the morning of the change (Sunday, March 31st) wake your child 30 minutes earlier. So if the morning is normally 7 am then wake them at 6.30 am – urrrggghh I know! Do the same with naps through the day starting them 30 mins earlier than you normally would. Then bedtime would also be 30 mins earlier. Then over the coming few days start adjusting to a new time by 10 minutes every few days – then you will be in new time before the week is out.

Route 3 – Tweak the timings. With this option, you work on adjusting their body clock a few days out from the change. In the week leading into the clock-change put them to bed 10 minutes earlier each night.

Spring Clock Change
So if your child goes to bed at 7 pm you will adjust this to 6.50 on night 1, 6.40 on night 2, 6. 30 on night 3 and so on until you reach 6 pm on the night that the clock change is going to take place. You will need to adjust morning wakes ups in the same way and also nap timings. The logic is that once you get to the change your baby or child will have adjusted to the new time ahead of the change.

One of the most important factors when it comes to sleep is room darkness. A dark sleep environment will support the production of melatonin (the sleepy hormone) and thus help support the initiation and maintained of sleep. If you have lots of light coming into your child’s sleep environment then their sleep will not be as well supported. With that in mind, this clock change brings with it super bright mornings from 5 am and lovely long evenings with 7 pm becoming a bright time of the day! As such I would encourage you to use my ‘black bag trick’ to darken your child’s room as much as possible or invest in good quality blackout blinds and heavily lined curtains.

Spring Clock Change
Once you stick to your routine and keep things as settled as possible for your child you should get through this clock change without too much trouble. If the wheels do come off the bus for a day or two, don’t panic. Simply do your best to stay true to your routine and how sleep is approached in your household and things will return to normal.
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